Celebrating Motherhood with Katy Moms

COVER STORY | By M.G. Angulo –

May is the month that we celebrate mothers.  So, this month, we talked with four Katy moms about what it means to them to be a mother – their fondest memories, their philosophies on raising children and valuable lessons learned.  Here’s what they had to share.


Sarah Nethery 


The Nethery Family: Nolan, Jarret, Harrison, Sarah and Ainsley. Photo by Memories by Elvia.

As a working mother in pharmaceutical sales, Sarah Nethery, 38, is thankful for and proud of her company allowing her the longest maternity leave – four months – that she has ever had. Nethery and her husband, Jarret, welcomed their third child, Harrison, in September. “I am proud of my company for leading the way in enhancing benefits for working mothers,” she said. The Nethery’s other children are Ainsley, 8 and Nolan, 7.

absolutely! Katy: What is the greatest thing about being a mother?

Sarah Nethery: The unconditional love from both sides. Motherhood truly shows you just how much you are capable of loving someone, and it’s pretty incredible!

AK: What is your fondest Mother’s Day memory?

SN: Probably when we took both of our mothers to The Aquarium in downtown Houston. It was such a fun day with our children and parents. I remember we especially enjoyed the little train ride together!

AK: What is your philosophy for raising well-rounded, productive children?

SN: Jarret and I agreed early on that raising our children in church to offer them a solid foundation of faith was extremely important to us. Balancing extracurricular activities with making sure they get plenty of outdoor play time to just be kids is also important, and we live in a wonderful neighborhood that fortunately makes this easy! And spending time with grandparents because it takes a village, and our children are very blessed to get to spend time with both of their grandmothers each week. We also have a “no TV or technology on school nights” rule in our home. Hopefully, these things help them become well-rounded and productive – only time and prayers will tell.

AK: What is the one thing your mother did when you were a child that you swore you would never do – and did?

SN: I always found it humorous that my mother could not stand to wake me. She said I looked so peaceful when I slept that she hated having to get me up. I didn’t see myself ever having that issue, but I do! It breaks my heart to wake up one of my sweethearts when they’re sleeping soundly, and I’ll do anything to avoid it.

AK: What advice would you give mothers?

SN: I encourage mothers to be supportive of each other and have grace. We all have our own parenting styles, none of which are necessarily right or wrong. We’re in this journey of motherhood together!


Lori Ann Belin


The Belin Family: Scott, Lori Ann, Anna Leigh and Scotty.

Following in the footsteps of countless mothers before her, Lori Ann Belin is a mother who will eventually see her children, Scotty and Anna Leigh, take flight and “leave the nest,” a notion that makes her and her husband, Scott, an associate pastor at a Katy church, proud. Aside from her family and handling the marketing and promotions for her husband, Belin devotes her time to her home-based business with Plexus Worldwide, called the Health and Happiness Company. She is also working on a feature film project and volunteers for charities and organizations that are near and dear to her.

absolutely! Katy: What is the greatest thing about being a mother?

Lori Ann Belin: Watching your children begin to fly on their own – when they make good choices, and it pays off. It always seems like a metaphor of the times as you watched them waddle their first steps or learn to ride a bike. When they fall, you pick them back up, dust them off and encourage them to try again. I remember after our son was born, I had “the blues” and was crying one day when my husband walked in. He asked why I was crying, and I replied, “One day he is going to grow up and leave me!” Funny how I was already worried about that when he was just a few days old. Scott told me, “That is a long way off.” Not so much anymore, though. But the truth is, that is exactly what we are raising them to do. To grow up, find their purpose and live it. I hold onto the scripture verse that says in Proverbs 22:6, “Train up a child in the way he should go and when he is old, he will not depart from it.”

AK: What is your fondest Mother’s Day memory?

LAB: I have loved them all. To this day I ask my children for handmade cards or letters. I have kept them all. The kids read them to me on Mother’s Day, my birthday and Christmas. My plan is to make a book out of them, so when I am old I can sit and read them and reflect on the days gone by.

AK: What is your philosophy for raising well-rounded, productive children?

LAB: It’s important to stop and listen to their concerns, their questions and all about their day. It’s an opportunity to hear their heart. When they are teenagers, you will practically be begging them to open up. Communication is key. I also had to let go of the vain idea of perfection — that it is relative to my own ideas of what they are meant to become. I loved watching our son play baseball, but yet he chose not to continue in high school. He loves martial arts and is amazing at it. He is working on his third degree back belt and has been asked to test to become an instructor. Both kids are highly creative and are so funny, but they are also dyslexic, which is challenging for them at times. Things do not always fit in a perfect little box though with the perfect little bow. God has a plan for each of them. It’s our job to raise them to know Him and to seek Him for themselves, and The Lord will show them what He created them for.

AK: What is the one thing your mother did when you were a child that you swore you would never do – and did?

LAB: My mom was pretty strict about cleaning house. We would joke about the “white glove” inspection. I come from a long line of ladies who like things to be neat and tidy. I say things like, “If you’re going to do something, do it right the first time, so you do not have to do it again.” I hated that when I was a kid! I have actually relaxed a bit on that one, but I do think sometimes children can lack discipline and proper expectations of a job well done when it comes to helping around the house. We should teach them these things because one day they may have a boss that will expect them to do a good job.

AK: What advice would you give mothers?

LAB: The first thing is to pray. We do not have all the answers, but we can pray to the Lord for wisdom, discernment and for lots of patience. When our children were small, and I stayed home with them, moms of older children would tell me how fast that time would go by and to just enjoy all the little moments. Now, I completely understand how good this advice was. Time does go by fast, and there are so many distractions along the way. Slow down, enjoy the little things, the milestones, the “firsts” and celebrate them. Notice the “lasts.” There will be many of them as well. Don’t be so hard on yourselves as moms, as wives, as women. Take a little time for yourselves so you can be fully present and not just physically present for your family. If you mess up, admit it. Say I’m sorry but also hold your ground on the important things.


Eli Hinojosa


Eli Hinojosa, Rob, Carolina, Michelle and Grace Anderson, Senator Lois Kolkhorst and Lillie Kate Anderson.

Eli Hinojosa has been married for 44 years to her husband Joe, and they have two children and three granddaughters: Grace, Carolina and Lillie Kate. As a woman who is both a mother and grandmother, Hinojosa, a retired educator, has a unique perspective on motherhood.

absolutely! Katy: What is the greatest thing about being a grandmother?

Eli Hinojosa: Just being able to be there for them. They often come over just to spend the night with us, and one of my granddaughters loves to cook.  Helping her become a little chef is great. And as a mother, just seeing my children grown and happy makes me happy. It’s great to keep teaching all of them and just loving on them. My husband is the same, and we’re blessed to live close after so many years traveling because my husband worked in oil and gas. We even lived in Australia for three years, and it was beautiful, but it was sad being so far away from my grandchildren. It’s all about being a grandmother now!

AK: What is your fondest Mother’s Day memory?

EH: There have been so many and one isn’t better than the other, because they were always good. Even when we lived in Australia, my kids would call, which was a little challenging for them because of the time difference.  What it comes down to is I was happy, and they were happy. And with three beautiful granddaughters, there is even more love.

AK: What is your philosophy for raising well-rounded, productive children?

EH: Making sure your children know you will always be there, even after they are grown. And, you have to give them direction: take them to church, make sure they work hard in school and keep them active in and out of school. But most importantly is to support them. Just be involved with your kids to keep them on the right track. Both of my kids went to college and are in their careers, so I guess we did something right.

AK: What is the one thing your mother did when you were a child that you swore you would never do – and did?

EH: My kids can attest to this: I am the worst worry wort. My mom was like that, and I swore I wouldn’t be when I had kids. Well, I was wrong. I tell my kids, “I’m supposed to do this. I’m supposed to worry.” Even when they leave home to start their own lives, you constantly worry about your children.

AK: What advice would you give mothers?

EH: My advice is just to always be there for your kids, no matter how old they are, and to treasure every shared moment with them. Always be open and just love on them.


Chakilla White


Chakilla, Chandler, Lewis and Landan White.

Group Vice President for DaVita, Chakilla White, 41, knows well the need to balance work life and family life with young children in school. She and her husband, Lewis, have two children, Chandler, 9, and Landan, 2.

absolutely! Katy: What is the greatest thing about being a mother?

Chakilla White: The greatest thing about being a mom is just watching the kids develop into their own person. I love each of their laughs, how they approach problems different and love to see the joy on their faces when they accomplish goals, whether their first steps or winning first place in a competition.

AK: What is your fondest Mother’s Day memory?

CW: My fondest Mother’s Day memory was being able to take my grandmother, my mom and my daughter to their first formal afternoon tea. It was four generations of ladies just enjoying the moment together.

AK: What is your philosophy for raising well-rounded, productive children?

CW: Following my parents’ example to raise children in Christ, teach them to strive for excellence and to be kind.

AK: What is the one thing your mother did when you were a child that you swore you would never do – and did?

CW: I swore I would never go out in public looking like “a mom.” Yes, you will catch me in sweats and tennis shoes with no make-up and a ponytail running errands on weekends.

AK: What advice would you give mothers?

CW: My advice for working moms is that you have to be okay that it is quality over quantity when it comes to time. So, try to understand what the non-negotiable moments are, protect them and be fully present for your kids. Lastly, for all moms, extend yourself some grace.

Happy Mother’s Day to all of our Katy moms!  We hope you make some of the best memories ever with your family.